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Student Suicide Prevention

A high school student sits in his counselor's office. The counselor is smiling and leaning forward. The student is facing toward the counselor, leaning his chin on his hand.

September was National Suicide Prevention and National Preparedness Month. Now that September has come and gone, how do you feel about your school’s readiness to prevent and respond to student suicide?

The School Resources for Military-Connected Students website offers a series of 42 free, online, on-demand, bite-sized learning modules that examine and talk about preventing and responding to student suicidal ideation, student suicide attempts, and student suicide and those left behind. You can complete the entire series, or you can focus on a specific module or several modules based on your school’s needs. The learning modules are based on research that pertains to student suicide. We invite you to explore the first training in the series, which is listed below:

Readiness to Prevent Student Suicide

  • Create a plan to improve the readiness of you and your school to detect and respond to student suicide ideation.

Additional Resources

Below are additional resources to help you strengthen suicide prevention efforts in your school:

Suicide Prevention Resource Center: School Resources

  • The link above will take you to a website compiled by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center in collaboration with the University of Oklahoma and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). This website houses a variety of resources and information that intend to help schools take action to prevent student suicide. It also offers information on how schools can prepare to react and respond when a student suicide death does occur.

Model Youth Suicide Awareness and Prevention Policy

  • The link above is a resource that was created to identify and inform those involved in school settings about Pennsylvania’s Model Youth Suicide Awareness and Prevention Policy. This was created, exclusively, for school entities.

Preventing Youth Suicide: Brief Facts and Tips

  • The link above is a fact sheet created by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and it includes information about student suicide. This fact sheet provides facts and tips that intend to help school personnel prevent student suicide.

Thank you for all you do to support military-connected students. We hope these resources are useful in your professional practice. If you have questions or need help, visit the Contact Us page to reach out to us. If you would like to receive updates about new trainings or resources, sign up for our Mailing List.

Establishing Routines that Promote Positive Student Behavior

Many educators have had trouble managing student behavior at one time or another. But, did you know that the routines you establish at the start of the school year can encourage positive student behavior that could last the whole school year? The School Resources to Support Military-Connected Students website offers free online learning modules and resources that can help you create a positive learning environment for your students.

Learning Modules

Making Classroom Rules

  • Learn how to adapt and implement rules that can promote positive behavior in students.

Classroom Arrangement

  • Learn how to create a classroom that promotes positive behavior in students.

Behavioral Expectations by Activity

  • Learn and define behavioral expectations to implement in instructional activities.

Resources

Maximize Structure and Predictability

  • This worksheet will help you establish routines that will increase the structure and predictability of your classroom procedures.

Reducing Problem Behaviors in the Elementary School Classroom

  • “Designed for elementary school educators and school- and district-level administrators, this guide offers prevention, implementation, and schoolwide strategies that can be used to reduce problematic behavior that interferes with the ability of students to attend to and engage fully in instructional activities” (Institute of Education Sciences, 2008).

Thank you for all you do to support military-connected students. We hope these resources are useful in your professional practice. If you have questions or need help, visit the Contact Us page. If you would like to receive updates about new trainings or resources, sign up for our Mailing List.

 

References

Institute of Education Sciences. (2008. September). Reducing behavior problems in the elementary school classroom. https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/PracticeGuide/4

Welcoming New Military-Connected Students to Your School

As the beginning of the school year approaches, teachers and school personnel need to prepare for the arrival of new military-connected students who are experiencing geographic transitions. Fortunately, there are strategies that can be implemented to help these students feel welcome in your school. We offer free online training to help administrators, school psychologists, school counselors, teachers, and other school personnel prepare for and work with military-connected students. Below, find links to the training courses and brief descriptions of the content that is covered in each course:

Learning Modules

Military and Schools

  • Understand the challenges that military-connected students may face.
  • Understanding the different types of military work-related parental absences that may impact military-connected students.
  • Understand and identify different resources to help support military-connected students and their families.

Geographic Transitions

  • Recognize the risk factors and protective factors that can influence students who are experiencing geographic transitions.
  • Understand how military-specific geographic transitions can affect students.
  • Support military-connected students who may be experiencing geographic transitions using both formal and informal methods.

Interstate Compact on Educational Opportunity for Military Children

  • Describe and identify military-connected students who are protected underneath the Interstate Compact.
  • Describe and recognize legal requirements schools and educators need to consider when working with a student transitioning due to family members’ military orders.
  • Describe and recognize legal requirements that apply to any state-specific legislation in regard to special education services in regards to military-connected students protected under the Interstate Compact.

The resources, below, can help you prepare to welcome new military-connected students to your school:

Military-Connected Student Enrollment Form

  • To fully support all military-connected students, schools need to identify these students. Schools could do this by including military-specific questions on their enrollment forms. See the example document.

A Guide to the Interstate Compact for Schools and Local School Districts

  • This guide was developed by the Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) to inform and guide schools and local school districts when working with military-connected students that are protected under the Interstate Compact.

Risk and Protective Factors for Mobile Students

  • How a student responds, positively or negatively, to transitions may be due to risk factors and protective factors. Recognizing these factors and understanding how these factors can support or undermine students’ well-being can help you better champion mobile students.

Thank you for all you do to support military-connected students. We hope these resources are useful in your professional practice. If you have questions or need help, visit the Contact Us page to reach out to us. If you would like to receive updates about new trainings or resources, sign up for our Mailing List.

Welcome!

Hello and welcome to the School Resources to Support Military-Connected Students website! Our goal is to provide school personnel with free, evidence-based resources to support military-connected students. This project is part of the Clearinghouse for Military Family Readiness, an applied research center at The Pennsylvania State University. This project is funded by the Department of Defense Education Activity Grant number HE1254-19-0009.

This article is the first in our series about the features of this website. In this article, we will focus on the trainings available to support school personnel in their work with military-connected students.

We have created a variety of free, evidence-based, on-demand, online trainings related to the following categories:

Our trainings are designed to fit into the busy schedules of school personnel. Each training is only 10-15 minutes in length and focuses on a single, actionable skill. At the end of each training, a grab-and-go resource is provided to help you implement the skill into your daily practice. Most trainings do not require any prerequisites so you can focus on the trainings that would be most helpful to you. To identify the trainings that would be most helpful to you,  you can search and/or filter all available trainings by category or recommended audience (i.e., teachers, administrators, school psychologists, school counselors, school nurses).

Thank you for all you do to support military-connected students. We hope these resources are useful in your professional practice. If you have questions or need help, visit the Contact Us page to learn how to reach out to us. If you would like to receive updates about new trainings or resources when they are available, sign up for our Mailing List.